"The Eternal Equinox" by Jared Ledgard

Disclaimer

"The Eternal Equinox", by Jared Ledgard

THE ETERNAL EQUINOX (2008)
PAPERBACK: 426 pages
AUTHOR: Jared Ledgard
ISBN NUMBER: 978-0-615-25541-5
PUBLISHER: Jared Ledgard (2008)

The Eternal Equinox is a revolutionary and radical book designed to train the defense services of nations to better help them understand the ideologies, theologies, beliefs, causes, and structure of terrorism and their individual attributes, and how to combat them. The Eternal Equinox is broken down into various chapters explaining the ideologies, theologies, and structure of the various attributes of terrorism including Islamic radicals, Christian radicals, Jewish radicals, Buddhist radicals, Hindu radicals, Atheist radicals, Eco terrorists, and Anarchist ideologies, theologies, and structure. The book then discusses the Influences, causes, and motivational factors of terrorism. It should be noted that this book contains graphic images and strong language and is indented for adult readers. This book contains radical ideas and forecloses information that may be shocking or confusing to some readers. The following book does not reflect nor express the ideas or beliefs of the author or publisher in anyway.

Table of Contents

Disclaimer Page 2
Chapter 1: An Introduction to the theology of terrorism and fundamentals Page 3
1a. What exactly is terrorism? Page 3
The official definition Page 3
The unofficial definition of terrorism Page 4
1b. Is terrorism a new idea? Page 5
1c. Introduction to motivational factors of terrorism Page 5
Resources and energy depletion and the new trend: "anti-Americanism" Page 5
Religion and terrorism, and the two-way-street protocol Page 6
1d. Threats, tactics, and theory posed by terrorists Page 8
The most widely used tactics of terrorism Page 10
1e. How Poverty, poverty trends, and global spending contribute to terrorist activities Page 11
1f. Insurgency, guerrilla warfare, and theory Page 12
Introduction Page 12
Basic rules for Guerrilla warriors and tactics Page 13
1g. Introduction to terrorist structure Page 14
Chapter 2: Islamic radicals/extremists ideologies, theologies, and ideas Page 17
2a. Islamic radicals/extremists ideologies Page 17
2b. Islamic radicals/extremists view of Axis and Allies Page 22
2c. The Master Goal (Islamic radicals version) Page 23
3d. Islamic radical/extremist terrorist formations Page 25
Chapter 3: Christian radicals/extremists ideologies, theologies, and ideas Page 37
3a. Christian radicals/extremists ideologies Page 37
3b. Christian radicals/extremists view of Axis and Allies Page 42
3c. The Master Goal (Christian radicals version) Page 43
3c2. The Master Goal (Aryan Brotherhood radicals version) Page 46
3d. Christian radical/extremist terrorist formations Page 48
Chapter 4: Jewish radicals/extremists ideologies, theologies, and ideas Page 59
4a. Jewish radicals/extremists ideologies Page 59
4b. Jewish radicals/extremists view of Axis and Allies Page 63
4c. The Master Goal (Jewish radicals version) Page 63
4d. Jewish radical/extremist terrorist formations Page 66
Chapter 5: Hinduism radicals/extremists ideologies, theologies, and ideas Page 81
5a. Hindu radicals/extremists ideologies Page 81
5b. Hindu radicals/extremists view of Axis and Allies Page 82
5c. The Master Goal (Hindu radicals version) Page 83
5d. Hindu radical/extremist terrorist formations Page 86
Chapter 6: Atheist radicals/extremists ideologies, theologies, and ideas Page 95
6a. Atheist radicals/extremists ideologies Page 95
6b. Atheists radicals/extremists view of Axis and Allies Page 97
6c. The Master Goal (Atheist radicals version) Page 98
6d. Atheist radical/extremist terrorist formations Page 100
Chapter 7: Buddhist radicals/extremists ideologies, theologies, and ideas Page 110
7a. Buddhist radicals/extremists ideologies Page 110
7b. Buddhist radicals/extremists view of Axis and Allies Page 112
7c. The Master Goal (Buddhist radicals version) Page 112
7d. Buddhist radical/extremist terrorist formations Page 115
Chapter 8: Anarchist radicals/extremists ideologies, theologies, and ideas Page 125
8a. Anarchists radicals/extremists ideologies Page 125
8b. Anarchists radicals/extremists view of Axis and Allies Page 126
8c. The Master Goal (Anarchist version) Page 126
4d. Anarchist radical/extremist terrorist formations Page 130
Chapter 9: Environmental/Eco Terrorists ideologies, theologies, and ideas Page 139
9a. Environmental/Eco terrorist ideologies Page 139
9b. The Master Goal (environmental/eco terrorist version) Page 141
9c. Environmental/eco terrorist formations Page 143
Chapter 10: Influences, causes, and motivational factors for terrorist activity, and theory Page 152
10a. Anti Americanism Page 152
America's superior attitude and attributes Page 152
Israel Page 152
America's invasion of Iraq in 2003 Page 153
Western propaganda, and America's propaganda machines Page 154
The American "NEW WORLD ORDER" system and those who cooperate Page 154
America's Middle East policy Page 155
The "New World Order", and Islamic radicals view thereof Page 156
10b. Inequalities of economics, employment, and consumption Page 157
10c. Religion and the religious-chemical cycle Page 157
Religious fanaticism and the reason for its existence Page 157
10d. American economics Page 158
10e. Americanization of the modern world and its negative consequences Page 159
10f. The Israeli issue and America's responsibility Page 161
10g. Abnormal analysis and theory: The future of terrorism and its causes and motivations Page 161
The theory of resource depletion Page 162
The theory of Americanism Page 162
The theory of Americanism part II, and the American belief system Page 162
The theory of religion and the way it may work in the minds of terrorists (a psychological analysis) Page 163
The theory of Americas democracy and its war machine (an interesting analysis) Page 163
The theory of "trash talking", and American Propaganda Page 164
Chapter 11: Terrorist tactics, strategies, and theory Page 165
11a. The terrorist creed Page 165
11b. Disrupting an enemy countries ability to function Page 166
11c. Terrorist targets, tactics, and strategies thereof Page 167
Introduction Page 167
11d. The primary forms of terrorist attack Page 171
Introduction to the primary forms of terrorist attack Page 171
The primary forms of terrorist attack: Infiltration Page 171
The primary forms of terrorist attack: Car Bombings/Suicide bombings Page 172
Suicide Bombings Page 173
The primary forms of terrorist attack: Hijackings (airplanes, trains, vehicles) Page 174
Hijacking an aircraft from an overseas destination Page 174
Anti-aircraft bomb Page 176
Secondary bombs Page 177
Smuggling explosives onto airplanes Page 177
The primary forms of terrorist attack: Sniper operations/Ambushes Page 178
Sniper operations Page 178
Sniping airlines from a distance Page 180
Ambush I Page 180
Ambush II Page 181
Ambush III Page 181
The primary forms of terrorist attack: Mail/Letter bombs; postal mail attacks Page 181
11e. The primary forms of terrorist attack: Executions/assassinations Page 183
Classic examples of beheadings for generating propaganda to influence fellow peoples to join terrorist organizations Page 184
The primary forms of terrorist attack: Nuclear/Biological/Chemical operations Page 190
1. Nuclear terrorism Page 191
2. Biological terrorism Page 192
3. Chemical terrorism Page 192
Methods of Dissemination of warfare agents Page 198
The primary forms of terrorist attack: Cyber attacks Page 201
Computer and electronic viruses Page 203
Speculative example of theory: Page 204
America's first war in Iraq, a living example of more then just theory: Page 204
The primary forms of terrorist attack: Rogue, Individual, and/or "Proprietary" attacks Page 204
Chapter 12: Tactics/Strategies for dealing with terrorism Page 206
12a. Establishing an interactive intelligence network Page 206
Strategic gathering of information Page 206
The over emphases of technology Page 206
12b. Establishing an international judicial system Page 207
12c. Establishing and maintaining an organized information system Page 208
12d. Establishing an international "threat index" based on analytical data and reforms Page 210
The Official threat index (according to the US governments Homeland Security Agency) Page 210
The International threat index (ITI) based on analytical data Page 211
12e. Learning to identify threats Page 212
12f. Educating the public on the dangers of immigration, and use of immigration by terrorists to infiltrate and gain access (the social infiltration scenario) Page 214
Infiltration Page 214
Negative affects of immigration other then infiltration by terrorists (the indirect terror approach) Page 214
Chapter 13: Tactics that do not work in fighting terrorism Page 216
13a. Creating stiffer anti-terrorism policies and measures at home Page 216
Introduction to the "The Patriot Act" Page 216
Executive order 13224 (The George W. Bush Order) Page 216
Designation Criteria for executive order 13224 Page 216
Legal Consequences for executive order 13224 Page 217
Arrest without warrant Page 217
Holding terror suspects without legal representation, counsel, or without sufficient evidence Page 218
Tracking and keeping watch on foreign exchange students Page 218
13b. Government agencies being more "aggressive", and the negative attributes Page 218
Government agencies as the CIA and FBI being more aggressive Page 218
Negative solutions for suppressing terrorist activity (using America and radical Islamists as an example). A living example. Note: the following is for example only, and does not support the ideas or beliefs of the author or publisher. Page 218
13c. Torture Page 219
Introduction and basics Page 219
13d. Generating mis-leading information, jumping to conclusions, judging, and creating inaccurate claims (by the media and/or government) Page 221
13e. Patriotism Page 222
13f. Increasing the degree and severity of security on national levels Page 223
Chapter 14: Guerilla Warfare, Insurgent activity, and methods of their understanding Page 224
14a. Insurgent and guerrilla warfare units and structure Page 224
14b. Establishing guerrilla fighting units with different attributes Page 229
14c. Building a Fighting Force from the squad up Page 231
SQUAD INVENTORY A1 Page 231
SQUAD INVENTORY A2 Page 233
SQUAD INVENTORY A3 Page 234
SQUAD INVENTORY B1 Page 236
SQUAD INVENTORY B2 Page 238
SQUAD INVENTORY B3 Page 239
SQUAD INVENTORY C1 Page 241
SQUAD INVENTORY C2 Page 242
SQUAD INVENTORY C3 Page 243
SQUAD INVENTORY D Page 244
SQUAD INVENTORY E1 Page 245
SQUAD INVENTORY E2 Page 245
SQUAD INVENTORY E3 Page 246
SQUAD INVENTORY F1 (Special Operations) Page 247
SQUAD INVENTORY F2 (Special Operations) Page 248
SQUAD INVENTORY F3 (Special Operations) Page 249
SQUAD INVENTORY F4 (Special Operations) Page 249
14d. Methods of Engaging the Enemy (guerrilla tactics) Page 251
Ambushes Page 251
A. Personnel ambushes Page 251
B. Mechanical ambushes Page 253
C. Indirect Fire Ambushes Page 255
D. Tag and Bag Direct Fire operations Page 255
E. Ambushing Communications sites Page 256
F. Ambushing Transportation vehicles and stations Page 256
G. Attacking enemy held or controlled refineries, chemical plants, factories, industrial trains, ect., Page 257
H. Attacking enemy held/controlled train stations, rail tracks, bridges, ect., Page 258
I. Attacking enemy held/controlled ports and docks. Page 258
J. Attacking enemy held/controlled ammo depots or similar supply areas. Page 258
K. Ambushing armored convoys and vehicles Page 258
L. Ambushing operations in city and urban environments Page 261
M. Ambushing Government Motorcades Page 263
N. Engaging enemy armor in urban environments Page 263
O. Engaging enemy troops and un-armed vehicles in urban environments Page 264
14e. Intelligence gathering, counter intelligence, and protecting your organization from spies and infiltrators Page 264
Intelligence gathering Page 264
Counter intelligence, and protecting your organization from spies and infiltrators Page 265
14f. Special operations (Booby-traps, mines, bombs, and sapper operations) Page 266
Booby-traps, mines, and bombs Page 266
Sapper operations Page 267
14g. Tactics and strategies and operational scenarios (military engagement scenarios for learning Tactics and Strategy) Page 267
Combining different troop attributes to carryout operations Page 267
Conclusions Page 273
14h. Communications Page 273
14i. Understanding the logistics of Insurgency Activity and conclusion Page 275
Chapter 15: Weapons, Vehicles, and Aircraft identification Page 277
15a. Weapons Page 277
Pistols Page 277
Sub-riffles Page 278
Rifles Page 280
Shot Guns Page 283
Medium Weapons Page 284
Heavy Weapons Page 285
Grenades Page 286
15b. Vehicles, tanks, and aircraft identification and familiarization Page 288
Light to Non-armored Vehicles Page 289
Tanks Page 299
Helicopters Page 301
Aircraft Page 307
Chapter 16: Anti-terrorism and Counter terrorism training programs, structure, operations, and theory Page 336
16a. Familiarization with the anti-terrorism and counter terrorism units and forces Page 336
The two branches of terrorism Page 336
The two branches of anti/counter terrorist fighting forces Page 337
16b. Establishing anti-terrorism and Counter terrorism basic training entry requirements Page 337
Entry requirements for anti-terrorism and counter terrorism units Page 337
The physical examination (for both anti-terrorism and counter terrorism units) Page 338
The psychological examination (for both anti-terrorism and counter terrorism units) Page 340
The rules for normal behavior and signs and symptoms of mental illness (for both anti-terrorism and counter terrorism units) Page 343
IQ test for antiterrorism and counter terrorism units Page 344
Polygraph test (for both anti-terrorism and counter terrorism units) Page 348
Tally the polygraph test and net results Page 349
16c. Establishing basic training programs and structure for anti-terrorism and counter terrorism forces Page 350
Rank and file basics Page 350
16d. Ethics and ethical criteria for both anti-terrorism and counter terrorism units Page 353
The ethical problem solving Page 354
16e. Active duty anti-terrorism units and structure Page 355
The anti-terrorism basics Page 355
Anti-terrorist squad formation Page 356
16f. Active duty counter terrorism units and structure Page 357
The counter terrorism basics Page 357
Counter terrorist squad formation Page 358
10-man squad, standard assault formation ("descriptive example") Page 358
1) 10 man squad, standard assault formation ("working example") Page 360
2) 10-man squad, "serve and protect" assault formation-urban engagement ("working example", descriptive example omitted). Page 361
3) 10-man squad, "heavy engagement assault formation"-all out war engagement ("working example", descriptive example omitted). Page 363
16g. Active duty forensics Operations, and explosives criteria (warning! Graphic Content!) Page 365
Scenario: A terrorist attacks with explosives, regardless of the transportation vehicle (car, rucksack, package, ect.): Page 365
II. Policing up the bodies, inspecting the bodies and body parts as a result of the blast Page 366
III. Photographs and video coverage. Page 369
IV. Post scene investigations. Page 371
16h. On-scene familiarization of explosives related injuries Page 372
16i. Detonation Kinetics Page 374
Introduction Page 374
Primary explosives vs. Secondary explosives Page 376
16j. Explosives Chemistry Page 378
Introduction Page 378
Familiarization with explosives chemistry (courtesy of The Preparatory Manual of Explosives) Page 383
16k. Explosives Familiarization Page 390
Introduction (detonation verses deflagration; courtesy of The Preparatory Manual of Explosives) Page 390
The physics of explosives Page 391
Common explosives and their uses Page 393
Explosive detonations familiarization and destructive potentials Page 394
I. Focused Fragmentary Indirect shattering blast (anti-personnel) Page 394
II. Indirect shattering blast Page 395
III. Direct shattering effect of the ground (bomb was buried in the ground) Page 404
IV. Focused indirect shattering blast Page 404
V. Direct shattering blast Page 405
VI. Concentration force blast Page 409

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